Building Enyo Applications with BlackBerry WebWorks

How-to

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When we first released our porting guide for webOS developers, it was admittedly more focused on migrating from Enyo to standard HTML5. However, since both Enyo 1.0 and 2.0 are open source and run on the BlackBerry® WebKit Browser, it’s actually even easier to get Enyo applications running on the BlackBerry platform, and we’ll be updating our guide in the next couple weeks as well. All you need to get started is available right now though, so let’s take a look.

Enyo 1.0 comes directly from the webOS platform and is designed specifically for that OS, but its main requirement is WebKit, so it’s possible to make it work with BlackBerry 6 OS and up, including the BlackBerry PlayBook™ tablet and BlackBerry 10. At approximately 7MB, Enyo 1.0 is pretty large, and this can be a problem on our OS 6 and BlackBerry 7 OS phones as it’s approaching the size limit for an application install on those phones. However, that’s not an issue on the BlackBerry PlayBook tablet and BlackBerry 10. View this sample on Github to see how to create a BlackBerry® WebWorks™ config.xml for the Enyo Style Matters sample.

Enyo 2.0 is a new framework based on the ideas behind Enyo 1.0, but now built with cross-platform and mobile targets in mind first. It’s light-weight, highly extensible, and works great on BlackBerry. See this sample on Github for the Enyo Onyx Sampler as a BlackBerry WebWorks application.

Besides running Enyo itself, it’s quite easy to integrate BlackBerry WebWorks extensions into Enyo Applications for native capabilities. The final sample on Github shows how to use BlackBerry WebWorks APIs to capture Application information, show Battery status, track device motion, and interact with the native file system.

If you have an Enyo application and you are looking for a profitable market place, the BlackBerry App World™ storefront should be top of your list. Enyo based applications are well received and BlackBerry App World is a marketplace where developers do well, with 13% making more than $100,000. I’d love to hear from you if you have any questions and to take a look at your applications. Drop me a line at twindsor at rim dot com, or @timothywindsor on Twitter.

About Tim W.

Tim works on the Developer Relations team at BlackBerry, focusing on WebWorks, HTML5, and Open Source.

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